Beef

Filet Mignon with Herbed Butter and a Zinfandel Reduction

Photo Credit: http://hostthetoast.com/filet-w-h/
Written by Will Clark

Ingredients:

For the Filet Mignon:
2 (8 oz) filets
Salt and pepper
2½ tablespoons canola oil
For the Herbed Butter:
1 stick butter, softened
3 teaspoons fresh parsley, chopped
2 teaspoons fresh oregano, chopped
1 teaspoon fresh basil, chopped
½ teaspoon dried thyme (you can use fresh, I only had dried)
1 clove garlic, finely minced
½ teaspoon onion powder
Pinch of sea salt

For the Zinfandel Reduction:
1 cups Zinfandel (or another red wine)
1 cup beef stock
½ tablespoon soy sauce

Cooking Instructions:

Make the Herbed Butter:
Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl, and gently mix until the herbs are evenly distributed throughout the butter.

Place butter on a sheet of plastic wrap, and fold it loosely over the top.

Then, using the palm of your hand, roll the wrapped butter on a flat surface until a log shape is formed.

Fix the plastic wrap if necessary and place in the refrigerator.

Cook the Filet Mignon:
Let the filets come to room temperature for a half hour.

Season both sides of each steak generously with salt and pepper, and then coat with a bit of canola oil.

Add the remaining olive oil in a cast iron skillet over high heat and let warm for about a minute.

Add the steaks, and immediately reduce the heat to medium high.

Sear for 3 minutes, then flip the steaks, and sear the other side for 3 minutes as well.*

Transfer the steaks to a plate and top each with a large pat of herbed butter. Very loosely cover them with aluminum fool to keep them warm.

Make the Zinfandel Reduction:
Bring the heat up to high and pour the Zinfandel in, scraping to deglaze the pan.

Add the beef stock and cook until the mixture has reduced by half.

Then, stir in the soy sauce and continue to reduce by another half.

Remove from heat and drizzle the reduction onto the plate.

Place steaks over the reduction and serve.

Notes:
*This is for medium-rare steak. Adjust time accordingly depending on how you like your steak done.

If you have a meat thermometer, you can check the temperature of the center of the meat. Rare: 120 – 125 degrees F, Medium-Rare: 130 – 135 degrees F, Medium: 140 – 145 degrees F, Well Done: 160 degrees F and above.

Source: http://hostthetoast.com/filet-w-h/